WINTER HOURS: Closed from January through March.  Private tours are available during this time.
WINTERHOURS: Closed from January through March.  Private tours are available during this time.​

In situations where wild animals cannot be released back into their natural environment, it is essential to find a facility that can cater to their highly specialized needs. The Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary is dedicated to providing consistent, quality care for our amazing animals for the rest of their lives. In keeping with our mission, all of our animal residents are native to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, so they don’t have to adapt to an unfamiliar climate. Whether they’re here because they were orphaned, injured, or habituated, they help us with our conservation education work and bring joy into the lives of thousands that come to visit them every year.

M&M the Tiger Salamander at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
M&M

M&M

M&M became a YWS ambassador in 2022 after being found in a tree delivery to the Sanctuary. Due to amphibian's high sensitivity to pathogens, we couldn't responsibly introduce him into a new environment without knowing where he came from. So he has been moved into our herpetology wall in the education building.

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Mackenzie the Bobcat at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Mackenzie

Mackenzie

When Mackenzie was around 5 months old, she was found alone and emaciated. Montana Wild, state-run rehabilitation facility, provided immediate care and then sent her to YWS. Although Mackenzie likes following her roommate, Bob, she also maintains something of her wild nature, getting feisty with our keepers and shredding stuffed animals with abandon.

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Meeka the Raccoon at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Meeka

Meeka

Meeka was hit by a car in Wyoming, which resulted in the loss of her right hind leg. Meeka likes fruits (grapes especially) and veggies, while her roommate Cooper prefers chicks to eat. She loves to use her “hands” to pull food from a big straw broom head, and she’s adept with puzzle feeders. She is good with the keepers, even when she first wakes up.

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Mia the Red Tailed Hawk at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Mia

Mia

Mia came to YWS from Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks with a wing injury that left her unable to live in the wild. She is fed rats, and enjoys training activities with our animal care team. Mia sometimes joins the morning chorus of howls and calls with her own screech.

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Niles the Sandhill Crane at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Niles

Niles

Niles was brought to a rehabilitation facility with a neck injury when she was less than six months old. Although her wound healed, she was so young at the time, she became firmly imprinted and dependent on humans. Niles and Big Bird live separately as they do not get along with each other, but they often join together with other residents for a morning howl.

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Pauli the Prairie Falcon at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Pauli

Pauli

Pauli suffered a wing injury that led to full amputation of her right wing. She was originally pulled off exhibit due to health issues so they could be monitored in a calm and safe environment. She eats, preens, and enjoys enrichment activities comfortably in the presence of our keepers.

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Piglet the Hognosed Snake at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Piglet

Piglet

Piglet came to YWS from a family who wanted to re-home him. Raised by people, he is accustomed to human handling but can be sassy! He has a sand tank and specially built climbing wall. The term “hognose” comes from the upturned nose of this species, used for digging and burrowing. He is one of our animal ambassadors and one of our encounter animals.

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Poett the Crow at Yellowstone Wildlife Sanctuary
Poett

Poett

Poett was raised as a pet until she was brought to YWS. The family had begun teaching her words, so she will often yell “hola”! Poett is fully flighted but too habituated to human care to live in the wild. She often yells at wild ravens that land on top of her enclosure.

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